Category: Anaheim Antics

Star Wars Rebel Challenge – Running Two Races Back to Back

I don’t know about you, but it has been SO exciting to watch John’s running journey over the past few months as he has become quite the experienced distance runner.  In January, he took on his most difficult challenge yet, the Rebel Challenge!  Let’s just say that it was an accomplishment of galactic proportions! 

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When I first signed up for the Star Wars Rebel Challenge, I wasn’t thinking about the distance, duration, time, or training. I was thinking “lookie, cool medals!”.   The logistics of running a 10k followed by a half marathon hadn’t really entered my mind. After all, I had already run several 10k’s, and had completed my first half marathon (Avengers). And my time was pretty good, coming in at roughly 9:30-9:45 per mile. Needless to say, I was starting to feel a bit smug. In fact, I didn’t even get too serious about training until about 4 weeks prior. After all, I kept telling myself I was in good form from the Avengers Half Marathon. What could possibly go wrong?

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It didn’t help that I was feeling pretty good the day of the Star Wars 10k. The weather was cold and brisk, which I new could help keep my core temperature down. There were also several other Cast Members, family, and close friends running, which made the morning a welcome homecoming.

Before I new it, we were off!   I’ve seen backstage many times, but experiencing it with lights and music cheering runners on was invigorating. Cast donned Mickey Mitts cheering us on, while big screen boards flashed messages of encouragement. Transitioning to onstage areas was even more exciting: passing by the Sleeping Beauty Castle, running down Main Street, through the Esplanade, and Buena Vista Street were all accompanied with a sense of excitement and wonder, with Star Wars characters such as Stormtroopers and Jedi in strategic photo spots.

Before I knew it, I was crossing Disneyland Drive, nearing the finish line, the course lined with cheering Cast and Guests. An announcer called out participant names as they crossed. I picked up my speed, crossed the finish line, and heard the name of … Sean Astin! We ended up finishing the race at the same time. If I was going to be upstaged, it was nice to be upstaged by a Goonie. And my finish time? 54:16, for a pace of 8:44 per mile. A new personal record for any event!

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The next day came the Half Marathon. Same start location, same excitement. This time, just after starting, a runner clipped me and I did a graceful tumble into the plants along Disneyland Drive. With just a scraped knee, only my pride was wounded, I instantly jumped up to get back into the race. Even though I had just experienced the backstage and onstage course, it was no less exciting.

This time, after winding through the Parks, the course emptied onto Harbor Blvd, headed due south, took a turn on Garden Grove Blvd, wandered through Old Towne Garden Grove, and then turned back north on Harbor. Just before turning left on Katella (about mile 9), the previous day’s run finally start to take its toll, as aches began to kick in. Although slowed, I wasn’t deterred, as the course continued down Katella and right on Disneyland Drive, finishing in Downtown Disney just past ESPN Zone. I crossed the finish line at 2:07:19 (9:43 per mile). I felt slightly dismayed, since my Avengers Half Marathon time was two seconds faster at 9:41 per mile. But my dismay was short lived when I received the Rebel Challenge medal for a total of 19.3 miles run.

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There were a few lessons I learned:

1 – Rest after the 10k. Don’t go home and do gardening or chores, just because you feel invincible. It’s just the adrenaline talking.

2 – Eat plenty, but eat right. Sure, you just carb loaded, but your body just burned off all those calories. Replenish that stored energy, but also give your body protein.

3 – Rest. Yeah, you just got a spiffy medal, but you’re not done. You’ll still need to rest and decompress. You can’t party quite yet.

4 – Don’t compare. This was a big one for me. Running a half by itself it not the same as running a half after a 10k. You’re not going to perform the same way. Be okay with it.

5 – Enjoy it. Even if you’re like me, and run for time, there’s so much more to a race than getting to the finish line. Enjoy the Characters, the Cast cheering you on, the bands, the police offers, the spectators, and the countless volunteers that you’ll see along the course. They’re there because they’re supporting you. Let them.

Next Year: the runDisney Coast to Coast Challenge. Who among you will be joining me?

RADically Yours,

John

*****

John grew up in the Orange County area of California, always living in the shadow of the Disneyland Resort.  Known as the consummate storyteller to his friends, he has had an admiration of Disney since childhood, and is most interested in the Company’s history and heritage.  His favorite memory to date is setting foot in Walt’s apartment over the Main Street Firehouse.  John lives by what he calls the three F’s: faith, fun, and fitness.   Being healthy isn’t about adding years to your life; it’s about adding life to your years.  Nothing sums that up more than making Disney races a goal in every fitness plan.

Anaheim Antics: Uncle Disney’s Garage

Many of us Disney runners start off as Disney fans.  We love the parks, the films, the characters, and most of all we love the man who started it all, Walt Disney.  Southern California is full of Disney history and John is here to share some of those fun historic antics with us!  My inner Disney geek is smiling from ear to ear!

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For this month’s Anaheim Antics, I thought I’d give the running shoes a few days off, and share a bit of Disney history that came to light during my running of the Avengers Half Marathon. It starts with a bit of sad news. I recently received word that Arthur C. “Buddy” Adler passed away. Buddy Adler is not a Disney Legend, but he deserves to be, for one very special reason: He singlehandedly saved a vital piece of Disney History from ending up in a landfill, a small one-car garage considered Walt Disney’s first studio.

Buddy and I attended church together for many years at what is now Christ Cathedral (Mile 5 on the Avengers Half Marathon course).   At the time, he was a Contract Administrator in DLR Purchasing, and had a fond love of Disney Heritage. According to archivist Dave Smith, Walt Disney came to Hollywood in July 1923, and got a room at the house of his uncle, Robert Disney, at 4406 Kingswell Ave. Walt said his Uncle let him use his garage, so he built a “stand out of plywood boxes … right down there in the garage.”

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The house of Walt’s Uncle, Robert Disney, where it all began

In this garage, Walt began work on an animation reel for Alexander Pantages, who operated a chain of theaters in Los Angeles. But Walt moved down the street on October 8, 1923, to 4651 Kingswell in the back of a real estate office, and signed a contract for the Alice Comedies, so the Pantages reel was never finished.

4651 Kingswell, formerly the Disney Brothers Cartoon Studio, now a trendy boutique

4651 Kingswell, formerly the Disney Brothers Cartoon Studio, now a trendy boutique

Fast forward to 1981: Amateur animation fan Paul Maher saw a picture of Uncle Robert’s garage in some old slides of local landmarks. The next day, he found the garage at its original site. The current owner (Robert Disney had long since died) was renovating the house to rent it out, and the garage was slated for demolition. Maher contacted the owner (who had no idea of the history), and she agreed to sell the garage to him for $6400, provided he also rented the house. Maher later ran into financial problems, and tried to auction off the garage.

Enter Buddy Adler, who was present at the auction. Adler would later say “I started imagining what was going to happen to it; if it was going to be vandalized, destroyed or just cut up in pieces and stuffed into little bottles for souvenirs.” Adler began talking to strangers asking if they would like to combine their resources and make a bid. Within an hour, Adler enlisted eight people to buy the garage for $8,500, who called themselves “Friends of Walt Disney”. Adler also received a letter from Disney Archivist Dave Smith, verifying the authenticity of the garage.

Adler began looking for places to permanently house and display the garage, but none were forthcoming, until the Garden Grove Historical Society expressed interest. The Garden Grove Historical Society owns and operates the Stanley Ranch Museum, a two acre site just housing historic Orange County homes and structures, including the Stanley House (1891) and Garden Grove Post Office (1877). In 1984, the Walt Disney Studio Garage was relocated to the site, and is on public display today. Of this, Adler said, “It is important that this garage be preserved so children can look at the humble beginnings of a man who would later create an empire that brought happiness and joy to children all over the world. It’s a way to tell kids that you can start from nothing and, in a relatively short time, achieve great things. I’ve been a fan of Walt Disney since I was a kid. Heck, I’m still a kid, only a little older and a little grayer. I’m just tickled to death about this whole thing.

The Disney Garage at the Stanley Ranch Museum in Garden Grove, CA

The Disney Garage at the Stanley Ranch Museum in Garden Grove, CA

The next time you’re in town visiting the Disneyland Resort, be sure to stop by the Disney Garage at the Stanley Ranch, just 3 miles south of the Resort. Thank you to my pal Buddy Adler, whose contribution helped save a piece of our history from extinction. You will be missed.

RADically yours,

John

*****

John grew up in the Orange County area of California, always living in the shadow of the Disneyland Resort.  Known as the consummate storyteller to his friends, he has had an admiration of Disney since childhood, and is most interested in the Company’s history and heritage.  His favorite memory to date is setting foot in Walt’s apartment over the Main Street Firehouse.  John lives by what he calls the three F’s: faith, fun, and fitness.   Being healthy isn’t about adding years to your life; it’s about adding life to your years.  Nothing sums that up more than making Disney races a goal in every fitness plan.

Avengers Super Heroes Half Marathon: A Race Course of History, Heritage, and Legacy

In the three years that I have been writing Running at Disney, I’ve found that one of the best things about this experience has been getting to know my fellow Disney runners and reading their stories.  I’ve had the privilege of getting to know John this year when he stared writing Anaheim Antics for RAD and it has been wonderful to follow along in his journey towards his first half marathon.  I’m so proud of what he’s accomplished (wait until you see his time!!) and lucky to call him a friend.  I can’t wait to see where his legs take him next, but for now here is the the big race!

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When I first signed up for the Avengers Half Marathon, I knew I would want to write about the experience for RAD. What I didn’t know was that my actual race experience would differ from my expectations, and not for any reason that had to do with training, fitness, or endurance. In this case, it was the course itself. Winding through several Orange County sites of interest, the course was a personal. Many of the sites on the route were places that held personal and fond memories for me, and numerous other runners.

The start of the race was, of course, on Disneyland Drive, which was once known as West Street. West Street, along with North Street, South Street, and East Street, mark the borders of the original 1857 settlers’ colony of 200 arches, which became the City of Anaheim. Today, few people know the history of these four Anaheim streets, despite crossing them every day.

The starting line, looking north on Disneyland Drive

The starting line, looking north on Disneyland Drive

After winding through the Parks, the course continued down Harbor Blvd, and then turned right on Chapman Avenue. Chapman Avenue is named in honor of Alfred Chapman, who served as Los Angeles City Attorney and Los Angeles County District Attorney. But he is most known as the real estate businessman who, with partner Andrew Glassell, founded the City of Orange in 1888 (Anaheim borders Orange just east of Disneyland). I had the privilege of growing up in the City of Orange, and previously worked at Orange City Hall, so this bit of heritage was rather personal to me.

A beautiful but blustery sunrise on Chapman Avenue

A beautiful but blustery sunrise on Chapman Avenue

The course then wound through a site that was even more personal, and more famous: Christ Cathedral. Previously known as the Crystal Cathedral, it was the home base of Possibility Thinking preacher Rev. Dr. Robert Schuller. Dr. Schuller founded the church (originally known as Garden Grove Community Church) in 1955, the same year Disneyland opened, and built the Cathedral 25 years later to accommodate a growing congregation. Many will recognize the church’s Welcoming Center as Starfleet Headquarters from Star Trek: Into Darkness. On the church’s south side is a decorative display of gold bells, which was donated by Disney Cast Members attending the church in the 1960’s. In its heyday, the church had arguably more of Cast Members in its congregation of any other church in the area. After Dr. Schuller retired, a series of poor management decisions forced the congregation into bankruptcy. The property is now owned by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange, and known as Christ Cathedral. The former Crystal Cathedral congregation renamed itself the Shepherd’s Grove congregation, and moved to a new location just down the street: Our next stop on the course.

Sunrise at Starfleet Headquarters, aka, Christ Cathedral

Sunrise at Starfleet Headquarters, aka, Christ Cathedral

The course continued south on Lewis Street, passing the current home of the Shepherd’s Grove congregation. Many will recognize it as the home of the nationally televised “Hour of Power” television program, the longest running religious television broadcast on the air today. This is also my church home, where serve as director of the Shepherd’s Grove Handbell Ensemble.   It was very heartwarming to see members of the congregation line the route to cheer the runners on as we passed by, especially at 6:30am.

Shepherd’s Grove, home of the “Hour of Power”

Shepherd’s Grove, home of the “Hour of Power”

The course then continued down Garden Grove Blvd, then up the Santa Ana River Trail, and then through Angel Stadium. Angel Stadium is home to the Angels Major League Baseball team, which Disney owned controlling interest from 1996 until the team was sold to Arte Moreno in 2003. Under Disney’s leadership, Angel Stadium underwent a $118 million renovation, turning it into a state of the art facility. Many OC residents like me have grown up here, spending countless weekends in the stadium seats rooting for our Halos. The treat for the runners this day was being able to run through the Stadium itself, running the track around the field. One could easily imagine the good old days of Walt Disney sitting with original team owner Gene Autry in the suites overlooking the field.

Angel Stadium

Angel Stadium

The final leg of the race headed back to the Park, with the Matterhorn straight ahead. Several friends warned me about hitting the wall around mile 11, but it never happened. Perhaps it was the sight of the Matterhorn, or perhaps I was just in good form. I regained some of the speed I lost around mile 7, when encountering brutal wind gusts. The most grueling part of the course was just prior to mile 13. It was a straight shot up the Downtown Disney access road to the finish line, but for some reason, time seemed to pass very slowly. As the crowds got louder, and the finish line came in sight, it seemed like forever until my feet crossed that line. But when I did, it was such an insatiable feeling, as though could run 100 miles more.

Seeing the Matterhorn said the finish was just 2 miles away

Seeing the Matterhorn said the finish was just 2 miles away

Needless to say, I’m a huge fan of this half marathon course. It’s mostly flat, easy to traverse, runner-friendly, and with plenty of points of interest to keep you interested. I truly hope they use this same course for upcoming Disney half marathons. Local residents will no doubt fine many personal touchstones along the route, and out-of-town runners will discover new gems in the jewel that is Orange County’s Resort District.

Oh, and how could I forget to mention my own achievement?   This was my first ever half marathon. My final time was 2 hours, 6minutes, 47 seconds, for a pace of 9 mins 40 seconds per mile. That pace put me 1060th out of 10463 runners. Now it’s on to the Star Wars Half Marathon weekend, where I will be participating in the Rebel Challenge!!

Next Up: The Star Wars Half Marathon Weekend!

Next Up: The Star Wars Half Marathon Weekend!

RADically yours,

John

*****

John grew up in the Orange County area of California, always living in the shadow of the Disneyland Resort.  Known as the consummate storyteller to his friends, he has had an admiration of Disney since childhood, and is most interested in the Company’s history and heritage.  His favorite memory to date is setting foot in Walt’s apartment over the Main Street Firehouse.  John lives by what he calls the three F’s: faith, fun, and fitness.   Being healthy isn’t about adding years to your life; it’s about adding life to your years.  Nothing sums that up more than making Disney races a goal in every fitness plan.

Anaheim Antics: Race Between Races – A 5k Between the Halves

John has been training for months for this weekend’s Avengers Half Marathon (best of luck!!!) and he has been using many local races as part of his training plan.  This most recent race he ran with a former Disneyland Ambassador who shared the story of her running journey and what it’s like to run as a Disney cast member.  What a fun perspective!

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For some of you, running half marathons and full marathons are standard operating procedure, and your calendar consists of such a race every 2 months, or more. Then there are the rest of us: The marathon (half or full) is an annual or semiannual goal. What to do between those major races?   Thankfully, there are numerous smaller races to keep one in proper form. Personally, with my first half marathon (the Avengers) being around the corner, I enjoy the myriad of smaller races my local community has to offer. One of those races is the annual Chapman University 5k, which takes place through the streets of Old Towne Orange, CA, a mere ten minutes east of the Disneyland Resort.

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Many past and present Disney Cast Members run this race, so it’s often a reunion and fellowship opportunity. One of those is former Disneyland Ambassador Jolie Hales, whom I got to know shortly after I joined the Disney family. Jolie is a Chapman University alum, graduating with a master’s degree in film directing. I asked Jolie to share her thoughts with us on the running experience.

When Jolie was selected as a Disney Ambassador for 2011-2012, her teammate Rene signed them up for the Disneyland Half Marathon. “I had never had a desire to run more than a mile in my life for any reason whatsoever”, Jolie joked. Of that first Half Marathon experience, Jolie recalled, “It was so much fun! And I beat Rene, bahaha! I was hooked … I’m soooo grateful to Disney for turning me into a runner — I totally owe them for the huge change in my lifestyle”. Fast forward to the 2014 Chapman University 5k.

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The Chapman 5k is a fun, flat, straightforward course, which both the novice and seasoned runner will enjoy. Readers might recognize Chapman University from the films “Crimson Tide”, “Accepted”, or “Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle”.   Parking for this year was remarkably easy thanks to an underground parking structure on the north side of the Chapman Campus. Runners staged near the west gate, and after some words of encouragement by the Mayor of Orange and singing of the National Anthem, the runners were off! Says Jolie of the Chapman 5k, “This is my third year running the Chapman 5K, and I plan to run it every year, if I can. This year’s race was the best out of the three.”

Like Jolie, this was not my first Chapman 5k. I first ran last year, when the race was held during fierce Sana Ana wind conditions. “(The winds) definitely increased the challenge!” said Jolie of last year’s race, “When the wind was pushing with me, it was great! But when I was running against it, I felt like I was climbing a mountain.” Thankfully, this year’s race was met with mild weather and no winds whatsoever.

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The first leg of the race was the hardest, thanks to a hard left turn onto South Glassell Avenue just seconds after the starting line. This part of the run was a serious pinch point, making it hard to pass runners in front of you. But it was very brief, and the rest of the course was ample. The course continued down Glassell and around the beautiful Orange Plaza, established in 1888. The course then meandered through the local residential neighborhood, dotted with early 20th century Victorian and Craftsman style homes.

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Many residents cheered us on from their porches and lawns. Other scenery included the stunning gothic brick St. John’s Lutheran Church, the modern Mediterranean revival Orange Public Library, and the locally renowned Watson’s Drug Store and Soda Fountain (a MUST VISIT if you’re ever in town). The final leg proved to be the most fun. It was a long, straight shot up the course to the Chapman Campus, where the finish line was clearly visible from hundreds of yards back. That gave me motivation to pour on every ounce of speed. The Chapman University band and cheerleaders greeted the finishers warmly, and there were plenty of Disney voluntEARs to award the finisher medals.

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One great thing about being a Cast Member is running into other past and present Cast Members at races such as these. “At local races in Southern California, it’s pretty common to run into Cast Members, and I love it!” Jolie said. “The Chapman 5K is especially filled with cast members — both runners and as VoluntEARS at the finish line — it’s like a reunion each time!”.   Indeed. Running into Cast Members like Jolie is a real treat. If you ever see her at a running event, be sure to say hi.

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Would you like to hear more about Jolie’s running experiences? Don’t worry! Jolie shared with me a wealth of running knowledge, which will be included in future editions of Anaheim Antics. So stay tuned!

RADically yours,

John

*****

John grew up in the Orange County area of California, always living in the shadow of the Disneyland Resort.  Known as the consummate storyteller to his friends, he has had an admiration of Disney since childhood, and is most interested in the Company’s history and heritage.  His favorite memory to date is setting foot in Walt’s apartment over the Main Street Firehouse.  John lives by what he calls the three F’s: faith, fun, and fitness.   Being healthy isn’t about adding years to your life; it’s about adding life to your years.  Nothing sums that up more than making Disney races a goal in every fitness plan.

Anaheim Antics: Running Gear 101

When you first start running you think any old outfit and a pair of “comfy” sneakers from your local athletic chain will do the trick.  Then the chafing and blisters set in.  You quickly realize that running might entail a bit more than putting one foot in front of the other.  John is breaking all of this down for you today with a look at apparel (especially for you guys!), accessories and also some unneeded items.

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Running attire. Whenever those words creep into my vocabulary, I immediately know my wallet will shrink. I remember my first “real” run, three years ago, the Brea 8k. There I was, donned in basketball shorts and the obligatory white cotton tee emblazoned with the event logo and a $30 pair of sneakers. Looking back, I might as well have held up a sign that said “I’m a rank amateur and have no idea what I’m doing”. And I would have been right. By the end of the race, I was hot, uncomfortable, and my feet hurt. I learned very quickly that effective running requires effective attire.   There are some “must have” items, some “like to have” items, and some “oh, heavens no” items. My caveat here is that I’m referring mostly to men’s attire. Reviewing women’s attire would have been a little creepy. Not to mention, the fit wouldn’t be quite right. But I digress… Let’s dive into our closets and see what’s what:

MUST HAVE

Running Shirt – Toss the generic cotton tee. They’re heavy, absorb sweat, and don’t breathe well. Invest in a quality tech fabric shirt. Sure, they’ll set you back anywhere from $25 to $60, but they’re worth every penny. They’re lightweight, breathe very well, wick moisture away, and keep you cool. Thankfully, a lot of race organizers are dropping their give-away cotton tees in favor of a tech fabric shirt option. Although cheaper in quality, they still do the job better than a cotton tee, and are great for extra gym attire.

Running Shorts – Say goodbye to generic athletic shorts, and get a bona fide pair of running shorts.   They’re lightweight, don’t require undergarments (yep, I really went there. I could “box” around that, but instead I’ll be “brief”), fit better, breathe better, feel better, and, well, when it comes to, um, the family jewels, they treat you better (hey, this is a family friendly column, isn’t it?).

Running Shoes – The worst thing a runner can do is wear cheap shoes. If you don’t spend money anywhere else, spend your money here. Here in the OC, there are several fitness retailers that offer biometric measuring of your feet as part of their service. Quality running shoes will set you back $100 or more. But your shoes will be lighter, last longer, and you’ll feel like you’re running on air. Top those off with a pair of running socks, and your feet will thank you for the investment.

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Photos Courtesy of Nike & Under Armour

LIKE TO HAVE

Headgear – This is strictly a matter of preference. Some love them, some hate them. If you’re like me, you’ll need something to keep the sweat off the brow. Although I’m not a fan of cotton in running attire, I found that a simple cotton baseball cap worked well. I recently upgraded to a dri-weave baseball cap with the Disney “D” logo, and it’s served me even better.

Sunglasses – This is where form must follow function. Your pair of aviators or wayfarers just won’t cut it, regardless of the expensive logo on the side. You’ll need a lightweight, contoured pair of sunglasses designed for running. There’s not much worse than a pair of sunglasses sliding down your nose or fogging up during your run. Thankfully, they won’t cost an arm or a leg. My local shop has styles ranging from $30 to $110. I managed to find mine at a runDisney expo for a mere $20.

Music Device Armband – Everyone needs a place to put their iPhone, right? This is where prices and styles are as diverse as the day is long. Colors, band types, configuration, and materials are all over the place. For me, I kept it simple. I purchased an inexpensive armband off eBay for $6, and it’s suited me well for over a year.

Earphones – This is where it gets personal. I’m a big fan of the new Apple Earpods, but after 2 miles, they start falling out. For about $10, I found a product called the Eadbudi, which consists of over-the-ear clips that attach to your existing ear buds. This is a better alternative to having to ditch your favorite ear buds. But if you decide to do so, I recommend splurging with pair of Bluetooth headphones. No more wire between your head and your arm. Although they can range anywhere from $40 to $100, doing some homework and online searching will often net you a pair for less. Mine only set me back about $35, and the audio quality is superior. Be sure to consider features and battery life when making your decision. Nothing is more irritating that running 10k and having your headphones shut off at mile 4.

Waist belts – This is where I get particular. At a recent runDisney expo, I was searching high and low for just the right waist item to carry a few essentials. I stumbled upon the FlipBelt, and was hooked. The FlipBelt is a tubular waistband that is perfect for holding items such as your car keys, wallet, and cell phone. Unlike other waist packs, the FlipBelt contours to your attire. Its spandex-lycra fabric wicks moisture and fits snugly. Best of all, the FlipBelt is machine washable so you can just toss it in the washer with your workout attire. They run slightly small, though. I normally wear a medium, but I purchased a large. The reps at the FlipBelt booth were very accommodating, and encouraged you to try the different sizes and colors on. Reasonably priced, it only set me back about $30, and it by far the most versatile accessory I’ve purchased.

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Photo Courtesy of FlipBelt, Motorola, and EARBUDi

OH HEAVENS NO

Full-size & noise canceling headphones – I’ve seen these on runners and they’re just a bad idea, because they block sound around you. A runner needs to be able to hear his runners around him, as well as listen for the uncommon but necessary on-course announcements. I’ve seen more than one near-collision because a runner did not hear someone coming up alongside.

Backpack – I’ve seen a few of these, and I’ve never understood the appeal. First, you’re carrying weight, and weight is the enemy of the runner.   Second, they cover a runner’s back, interfering with the body’s thermoregulation. If anyone can explain the reasoning behind the backpacks, as we say at Disney, I’m all ears.

Water bottles – Maybe it’s not a huge deal on a 5k, but if you’re running a 10k or more, ditch the water bottles. Water is heavy. a 16oz container of water weighs over a pound, which can require you to use up to 80 additional calories per mile. Great while you’re trying to lose weight, but a bad idea when trying to endure a half marathon. Just rely on the on-course water stations. They’ll be plenty.

Outerwear jackets – A lot of runs start early in the morning, when temperatures are still nippy. It’s natural to want to put on an extra layer to keep warm. But the moment your cross that starting line, your body will do fine keeping warm on its own. When I ran the Knott’s Coaster Run, it was cold and raining. I was miserable, until about mile 2. By then, I was warm and comfortable, even though it was barely 60 degrees out. Less is more. Any additional layer makes it easier for your body to overheat. During my last 10k, I counted no less than 6 jackets abandoned on the side of the course in various spots. Be sure to leave your outwear behind.

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Photo Courtesy of runDisney

Being a huge Disney fan, I’m a great lover of the Red Car Trolleys at Disney California Adventure. The Red Car motto is Comfort-Speed-Safety. This should be the motto when choosing running attire. Quality attire will be comfortable, will contribute to your running speed, and won’t compromise your on-course safety. Enjoy shopping, and I’ll see you on the next course!

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Photo Courtesy of Disney

RADically Yours,

John

*****

John grew up in the Orange County area of California, always living in the shadow of the Disneyland Resort.  Known as the consummate storyteller to his friends, he has had an admiration of Disney since childhood, and is most interested in the Company’s history and heritage.  His favorite memory to date is setting foot in Walt’s apartment over the Main Street Firehouse.  John lives by what he calls the three F’s: faith, fun, and fitness.   Being healthy isn’t about adding years to your life; it’s about adding life to your years.  Nothing sums that up more than making Disney races a goal in every fitness plan.

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